Quest of the Blue Throated Macaws by Donald Brightsmith
       

Name:
Cherane Pefley
Business:
Heavenly Aviary
Phone:
772-234-4486
Email:
cherane@aol.com
Date Received:
6/28/2005

#
Label#
Species
BirdID
Sex
1
'
Blue-throated Macaw
' 6-24-2005
'Female
Two day old BTM in the nest box ... parents looking and watching me
     
look closely to the right..the white is a drill hole through the plexiglass
 and behind this you can see the baby.                     Look at that muscle on her head.
I'M THE STAR IN THIS HEAVENLY AVIARY.  I WAS PULLED FROM THE NEST BOX TODAY JULY 13, 2003.     
CLOSED BANDED TODAY AND WILL BE MICROCHIPPED BY DR. BACKOS
featherless and now at November 17,2005
25 DAYS OLD JULY 19,2005

click image to view video of the juveniles

Last October 2004
 





CLASSIFICATION

COMMON NAME:
blue-throated macaw, Caninde macaw (though this common name is associated with an inappropriate species classification - see 'GENUS SPECIES' below)
KINGDOM:
Animalia
PHYLUM:
Chordata
CLASS:
Aves
ORDER:
Psittaciformes
FAMILY:
Psittacidae (true parrots)
GENUS SPECIES:
Ara (macaw) glaucogularis [Some sources cite caninde, though this  is likely an inappropriate translation of Felix de Azara's 1802-1805 species account. 'Caninde' references a specific Tupi-Guarani name for the blue & gold macaw, Ara ararauna. Azara's description likely references A. ararauna.


Amos and Annie
OLD PAIR BLUE THROATED MACAWS GIVE THEIR FIRST EGGS HERE IN MY HOME AND GIVE ME FIVE BTM BABIES: CELESTE, TULA, KANDANCER, IZAR AND TIA

 Two months of diet and flying exercise.  Lipomas and cists are not to be found on  the male's body.  Together taking off to fly back to their nest box.          


                                                                                   





Click image to read cherane's messages on BTM Group.


http://www.hyacinthmacaws.net/HurricanesFrancisandJean/

    

http://www.fws.gov/policy/library/E8-17215.html                         
Blue-Throated Macaw (Ara glaucogularis) The blue-throated macaw is endemic to forest islands in the seasonally flooded Beni Lowlands (Lanos de Mojos) of Central Bolivia (Jordan and Munn 1993; Yamashita and de Barros 1997). It inhabits a mosaic of seasonally inundated savanna, palm groves, forest islands, and humid lowlands. This species is found in areas where palm-fruit food is available, especially Attalea phalerata (Jordan and Munn 1993; Yamashita and de Barros 1997). It inhabits elevations between 656 and 984 ft (200 and 300 m) (BirdLife International 2008c; Brace et al. 1995; Yamashita and de Barros 1997). These macaws are not found to congregate in large flocks; but are seen most commonly traveling in pairs, and on rare occasions may be found in small flocks (Collar et al. 1992). The blue-throated macaw nests between November and March in large tree cavities where one to two young are raised (BirdLife International 2000). The taxonomic status of this species was long disputed, primarily because the species was unknown in the wild to biologists until 1992. Previously it was considered an aberrant form of the blue-and-yellow macaw (A. ararauna), but the two species are now known to occur sympatrically without interbreeding (del Hoyo et al. 1997). BirdLife International (2008c) estimated there are between 50 and 249 mature individuals in the wild, and the population has some fragmentation and is decreasing. This species was historically at risk from trapping for the national and international cage-bird trade, and some illegal trade may still be occurring. Between the early 1980s and early 1990s, approximately 400 to 1,200 birds were exported from Bolivia, and many are now in captivity in the European Union and in North America (World Parrot Trust 2003). In 1984, Bolivia outlawed the export of live parrots (Brace et al. 1995). However, in 1993 (Jordan and Munn 1993) it was reported that an Argentinian bird dealer was offering illegal Bolivian dealers a high price for blue-throated macaws. Armonia Association (BirdLife in Bolivia) monitored the wild birds that passed through a pet market in Santa Cruz from August 2004 to July 2005. Although nearly 7,300 parrots were recorded in trade, the blue-throated macaw was absent in the market during the monitoring period, which may point to the effectiveness of the ongoing conservation programs in Bolivia (BirdLife International 2007). There are a number of blue- throated macaws in captivity, with over 1,000 registered in the North American studbook. Because these birds are not too difficult to breed, the supply of captive-bred birds has increased (Waugh 2007), helping to alleviate pressure on illegal collecting of wild birds, but not completely eliminating illegal collection. The blue-throated macaw is also at risk from habitat loss and possible competition from other birds, such as other macaws, toucans, and large woodpeckers (BirdLife International 2008b; World Parrot Trust 2008). All known sites of the blue-throated macaw are on private cattle ranches, where local ranchers typically burn the pasture annually (del Hoyo 1997). This results in almost no recruitment of palm trees, which are central to the ecological needs of the blue-throated macaw (Yamashita and de Barros (1977)). In addition, in Beni many palms are cut down by the local people for firewood (Brace et al. 1995). Thus, although the palm groves are more than 500 years old, Yamashita and de Barros (1977) concluded that the palm population structure suggests long-term decline. This species is categorized as ``Critically Endangered'' on the IUCN Red List, ``because its population is extremely small and each isolated subpopulation is probably tiny and declining as a result of illegal trade'' (BirdLife International 2004). It is listed in Appendix I of CITES (CITES 2006) and is legally protected in Bolivia (Juniper and Parr 1998). The Eco Bolivia Foundation patrols existing macaw habitat by foot and motorbike, and the Armonia Association is searching the Beni lowlands for more populations (Snyder et al. 2000). Additionally, the Armonia Association is building an awareness campaign aimed at the cattlemen's association to ensure that the protection and conservation of these birds is at a local level (e.g., protection of macaws from trappers and the sensible management of key habitats, such as palm groves and forest islands, on their property) (BirdLife International 2008a; Llampa 2007; Snyder et al. 2000). The blue-throated macaw does not represent a monotypic genus. It faces threats that are moderate in magnitude because wild birds are no longer taken for the legal wild-bird trade as a result of the species' CITES listing, and it is also legally protected in Bolivia. Wildlife managers in Bolivia are actively protecting the species and searching for additional populations. Threats to the species are imminent and ongoing because hunters still trap the birds for the illegal bird trade and annual burning on private ranches continues. Therefore, we assigned this species a priority rank of 8.

                                            
The Blue Throated Macaw by Dr. Susan Clubb

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